Systemic Team Coaching: the next big breakthrough in leadership development

As an avid reader of HR In Sights I’ve often stumbled upon wonderful articles which have helped me grow, both personally and professionally.

Sharing an excerpt from an article posted by Ben Quarless. Thank you Ben.

Systemic Team Coaching is a process by which a team coach works with a whole team in the context of their organisation’s current and future requirements to help them improve their leadership as a whole team and as individuals. Connections with, impact on and ability to influence and lead in the wider system are additional outcomes that the approach achieves.

In Systemic Team Coaching the team is coached a team as a unique and coherent ‘whole’.
Systemic Team Coaching is therefore not the same as individual coaching of each team member in a group setting and is also fundamentally different to ‘team building’ which is generally more focused on improving team-member relationships.

A systemic team coaching approach considers the team to be an inseparable entity whose performance and results depend on the systemic, interactive, operational responsibility of its members – functioning both together and apart.

408system_team_individual

The work starts with an inquiry as to the purpose and mandate of the team in the organisational context. The rationale and mandate for the team are examined from different perspectives to create clarity and purpose. Systemic Team Coaching is also primarily focused on achieving clear performance results as measured by mutually-created and measurable criteria.

Five conditions for effective Systemic Team Coaching

Systemic Team Coaching emphasises and focuses on the system alongside individual and team challenges. There are several conditions that engender effective Systemic Team Coaching:
1. There is a team of a small number of people with complementary skills who are committed to or can create a common purpose with a set of agreed performance goals and are willing to examine how they can most effectively work together and hold themselves jointly accountable
2. The team collectively aspire to achieve a greater level of performance
3. The team can be open to working with others on their learning and performance journey
4. The team recognise the importance of meeting stakeholder needs and connecting their work to the needs of the organisation
5. The team understand the impact they can have in motivating and inspiring others across the organisation and beyond
The right practitioner
A Systemic Team coach works with and alongside the team and does not stand outside with a focus on facilitation alone or indeed training alone. The answers lie within the team and wider system. As a result each team member has the opportunities to develop personally and professionally alongside moving towards greater organisational health.

Therefore it is essential that organisations work with a coach who has the capacity to work with the whole team and see beyond the individual personalities. Someone who challenges thinking and will variously provoke and invite the team to expand the boundaries of its’ thinking to enhance performance.

Does it deliver?

Systemic Team Coaching can deliver extraordinary results for the team and organisation. This holistic approach has been shown to deliver increased performance and collaboration amongst key teams because it actively seeks to work with the organisational factors that sometimes unconsciously block teams from working effectively together.
In my experience, within a System Team Coaching session you are likely to hear bold cut-through statements that get to the core of some of the organisation’s most acute challenges and the team coaching work which takes places is therefore deeply embedded in the service of the organisation’s overall performance and health.
Systemic Team Coaching actively looks for ways to connect the work and journey of the team back into the organisation and explores shifts and changes that it can make institutionally – upwards, laterally and cascading through the system. As a result, profitability, productivity, customer satisfaction and employee morale all benefit from the team’s improved ability to connect with, impact upon and lead in the wider organisational system.

Excerpt taken from article in HR In Sights posted by Ben Quarless

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